Now what? Re-case using book tape?

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I have followed Sophia’s video series regarding the Fairy Tale book, because I have a somewhat similar opportunity. My experience is limited in that I have been repairing children’s books for 3-1/2 years but I am completely self-taught. I am not inclined to invest in much more serious materials because I don’t believe I would ever use book cloth/muslin/buckram. But I do have book cloth tape, both 2″ and 4″ and have a plan to proceed with the book shown below. That said I am interested in any suggestions or thoughts on how to proceed. As one can see, the book as it came to me has been dismembered and rough edges cleaned up a bit. There are several loose pages still that go at the very end of text block. So in the absence of book cloth and not intending to replace end papers, I will undoubtedly attempt to re-case using single stitched hinge tape. I know, I know, but those are the materials I have and a limited skill set. Come on, offer some insight I welcome a challenge and info and will post the final “product” here.

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    Posted by (Questions: 32, Answers: 21)
    Asked on November 29, 2019 8:01 pm
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    I understand using what you have at hand. If what you have to use is book repair tape you can mitigate the problems that it presents in several ways. First of all, you can just treat it like it is pre-glued book-cloth. What I mean is go ahead and lift the original cover material and tuck the tape under it instead of going on top. Second be sure you maintain the hollow of the case-binding by creating a case-spine liner. Third, don't tape over the original spine and instead consider gluing it onto the new tape spine. 

    As for the inner hinges and the tape you plan to use there. You can trim the tape to be thinner so it both looks better and causes less damage to original materials. It is surprising how little is needed to reconnect the hinge. You might cut off half the tape width and it will be fine. 

    If you were to invest in any material at all, I would recommend getting some Sekishu (or similar) tissue and some archival paste to do the inner hinges. You can find them at local Art Supply stores (or here on the Save Your Books shop). That would cost you about $10 and would last for many books!

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    Answered on December 1, 2019 10:32 am
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      So, two thoughts. One, if I am NOT planning to replace or "use" new end papers to re-case the book, what about new mull on text block? Once I had it dismembered, and the back of text block pretty well cleaned up, the front most set of signatures was a bit 'loose". I squared the text block, pressed it down and coated spine with PVA. Now seems fairly solid, but I think adding mull to just the text block (nothing beyond the width of text block) will add some stability. Any ideas?

      Using tissue for the hinges is an interesting approach and totally new to me. I have done a bit of research through the various downloads, books, etc and am finding little to proceed. So if I do use the single stitiched tape to recase I REALLY like the idea of trimming it down some. Thanks.

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      Answered on December 3, 2019 7:13 pm
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        I think adding mull is a great idea. If you like, you can sew through any loose signatures through the mull.  By the way I love that you called disbinding the book dismembering it! lol. 

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        Answered on December 3, 2019 10:56 pm
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          Well, headed in the right direction I believe. See attached pic as mull (just the width of the text block) has been attached, head and tail bands added WITH a place marker ribbon. (Note the use of book weights made of brick wrapped with color pictures of our book shelves and covered with clear packing tape!!) Winter colds and the season's chaos has slowed the process here. But your videos and input have inspired me to take on more than I had planned to. Thanks. More to come as the recasing step approaches.

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            Answered on December 10, 2019 8:29 pm
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              Looking good! One note is that if you attach a ribbon to the text-spine it only has to attach by an inch or so. The breaking point will be the edge of the text-block and it won't pull off easily even with only an inch. The extra length being attached isn't a problem though except that it provides a pressure for the spine to bend against. So minor! I guess the main reason to have it be shorter is to save ribbon. Thank you for posting your progress!

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              Answered on December 11, 2019 9:52 am
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                I like the bricks too! I love that you used photos of your own bookshelves. Clever.

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                Answered on December 11, 2019 9:54 am
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                  The chaotic season certainly cuts into book repair....So the first attempt to "re-case" the book using adhesive backed, black cloth tape, was an EPIC fail. Started by positioning the front and back boards and clamping tight. I've been using 4" Irwin Quick-Grip 'cuz only need one hand. I used plain 8-1/2x11 printer paper to cut a template: slightly longer than spine, enough to "wrap" the spine and insert into the opened area between loosened cover and board(s). Intending to provide a backing to the spine, I cut an appropriate piece of poster board, then using the template, I measured and cut the cloth tape - still with adhesive backing in place. My intent was to c-a-r-e-f-u-l-l-y remove the adhesive backing, position the spine re-inforcement piece of poster board and e-a-s-e the structure into place including inserting the sides pieces between the loosened cover and boards. The adhesive exposed tape acted much like a love crazed octopus and I soon had a real mess on my hands...literally. Bunched it up and tossed it away. Fortunately no damage done except to my fragile book repairing ego. Tried again, this time simply leaving the trimmed up tape with the backing intact. Glued re-inforcing piece in place with PVA, moved structure to spine, lined it up, inserted edges in the area between loosened covers and boards and glued away. Top and bottom of spine I cut, turned the width of the spine under, then allowed for turn ins onto the boards both top and bottom. See results in pics. I feel I got a bit impatient and did not fully understand what I was doing as I did the top and bottom turn ins. So I am not overly fond of my result, but this was my first effort at such a task and all in all its OK. Still need to secure cover to text block. Watch this space.

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                    Answered on December 17, 2019 8:39 pm
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                      Since last post, the tattered spine was glued to the newly constructed spine. Surprising, it virtually covered the new spine. So despite the fact the original was pretty shredded, careful gluing allowed it to be reasonably (I think) retained. The last steps were to take Sophia's advice and trim the adhesive backed double-stitched hinge tape so it was not so wide. Pic shows it adhered to text block prior to attaching the boards with new spine. And finally, the inside hinge of one side. The result is a little stiff, but serviceable since I will be the only user for the next decade or so and it is now quite solid. I await an opportunity to review any insights Sophia has provided regarding worn cloth corners or edges. My last post will then show any work done to address those worn issues and I'll share some pros and cons that I learned from this exercise.

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                        Answered on January 11, 2020 8:04 pm
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                          I believe I will close this thread. As a first effort of this difficulty I feel OK, but here are some pros and cons. Pros: It was worth it, The book is in much better shape, I learned about structure and Sophia's input regarding adding mull to reinforce text block and to trim width of the adhesive backed double stitched hinge tape was invaluable. Cons: I really need to expand my horizons and learn about Japanese tissue, applying end papers, some basic sewing/stitching and I need some material like book cloth or muslin to replace/repair spine, using adhesive backed book tape (even cloth tape) did not work so well, need to review and apply the steps to put that new spine in place especially at the top edges of the boards, the turn-ins.....could have been better. Need some final effort on the corners and worn edges. Thanks.

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                          Answered on January 15, 2020 8:43 pm